50 Multiple Mini Interview Questions and MMI Interview Tips

50 Multiple Mini Interview Questions and MMI Interview Tips

Love it or hate it, the Multiple Mini Interview (MMI) has gained considerable traction in medical school admissions process, and chances are that you’ll likely undergo at least one MMI interview during your interview season, even in as an online interview format. MMIs are an important component of the med school selection process. You will be evaluated based on your responses to the respective prompt. MMI interviews favor quick critical thinking skills, adaptiveness, and communication skills. Although the station prompts are varied, there are still many ways you can prepare for MMI interviews. We will examine these in further details and provide MMI interview tips, MMI sample questions, and even full length MMI practice tests to help you prepare for success!

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    Dr. Rachel Rizal - Cracking Med School Admissions
    Rachel Rizal, M.D.

    Undergraduate
    Princeton

    Medical School
    Stanford

    Residency
    Harvard, Emergency Medicine

    Rishi Mediratta, MD, MSc, MA
    Rishi Mediratta, M.D., M.Sc., M.A.

    Undergraduate
    Johns Hopkins

    Medical School
    Stanford

    Residency
    Stanford, Pediatrics

    What is the Multiple Mini Interview (MMI)?

    Multiple Mini Interviews (MMIs) are a specific type of medical school interview that is increasingly growing popular among medical schools, even with the virtual interview format. With a traditional one-on-one interview, you meet with 1 interviewer at a time and the interview is a 30 to 60 minute conversation. During a MMI interview, applicants have multiple interview stations, 7-10 minutes each. You will have 2 minutes OUTSIDE the interview station without your interviewer to think about your response to a given prompt. Then, you will be asked to enter the interview room where you will have 5-8 minutes to give your response to the prompt to the MMI interviewer.  Each interview station has a different interviewer; each interviewer hears and rates (gives an interview score) each applicant’s response to the same prompt. These scores will be compiled an averaged, helping medical school admission committees with the selection of students. 

    For more information about Multiple Mini Interviews, check out our Mastering the Multiple Mini Interview course

    Here is what a typical Multiple Mini Interview Med School day feels like
    • You will cycle through 8-10 multiple mini interview stations

    • Each station is a total of 8-10 minutes long. At the beginning of each station, you have 2 minutes to read the interview prompt for that station outside the interview room

    • After 2 minutes, you will be prompted by an announcement to step into the interview room and you will be greeted by an interviewer. This interviewer will be random and can be a medical school student, a professor, or even a patient. Depending on the school’s multiple mini interview format, you have 6-8 minutes to discuss or act out the prompt for the station.

    • You will be given a score by each interviewer. Medical schools take into account that people rate interviews differently. Your score will be calibrated based on the aggregate score given by the interviewers during your session only. Remember, MMI interviewers (MMI interview raters) can be medical school admissions committee members, medical students, physicians, patients, and community volunteers. 

     
    What students like and dislike about MMIs

    Advantages:

    • You have time (usually 2 minutes) to prepare for each interview response.
    • You meet with multiple interviewers, and there will be a lot less bias throughout the entire process.
    • You have the ability to showcase your social skills and soft skills, since you have to connect with up to 10 interviewers in a given day
    • Applicants can showcase their medical knowledge because multiple mini –  interview questions range from medical ethics opinions to leadership reflections.
    • There is generally not one correct answer to an MMI medical school interview question.

    Disadvantages:

    • Students feel that this is not a personal interview because they cannot develop a meaningful conversation with the interviewers given the short length per interview station.
    • Difficult to incorporate your extra-curricular activities and clinical experiences. HOWEVER, we teach you how to do this in our MMI prep section below!
    • The questions can be challenging, and you have apply critical thinking skills about the question and then convey an articulate response – and you only have two minutes to think! Medical school applicants feel “rushed” while preparing a response to the question.
    • Students have difficulty organizing their thoughts and then communicating their ideas in a short window of time.

    How to prepare for the MMI Interview

    Our goal is to prepare you to have an excellent interview!

    The BEST way to prepare for your Multiple Mini Interview is by taking our “Mastering the Multiple Mini Interview” online, self-paced course. The course includes a mock interview with the course creators, Dr. Rishi Mediratta and Dr. Rachel Rizal.

    Dr. Rizal was part of the first class of accepted students at Stanford who went through the Stanford MMI interview. She was also an MMI interviewer at Stanford and knows how to stand out in the med school admissions process.

    The Mastering the Multiple Mini Interview course teaches you how to tackle different categories of Multiple Mini Interview questions. These techniques can be used for your traditional one-on-one personal interview and your panel interviews as well!

    Types of MMI questions: 

    1. Current event questions
    2. Team-based interview stations
    3. Ethical questions and scenarios
    4. Traditional interview questions
    5. Situational scenarios
    What The Multiple Mini Interview Course Will Teach You

    We recommends practicing as much as possible for your med school Multiple Mini Interview. Unlike traditional interviews, in which you can predict and prepare for most common questions, applicants will not know the exact questions that appear in their Multiple Mini Interview.

    The Cracking Med School Admissions “Mastering the Multiple Mini Interview” course prepares you on how to tackle ANY type of MMI question and how to give an EXCELLENT answer.

    • Dr. Rizal’s 4 S’s Framework
    • MMI practice questions
    • Sample responses to the MMI practice questions, complete with Dr. Rizal’s analysis of why the responses were good and how students can improve
    • 1 Mock Interview with Dr. Rizal or Dr. Mediratta will help you turn your responses from great to excellent. They have prepared premeds and medical students to ace their multiple mini – interviews. 
     
    What is the Cracking Med School Admissions 4S Framework?

    Each of your responses during an MMI question should incorporate the following:

    1. Structure
    2. Spirit
    3. Story
    4. Stamina

    Dr. Rizal will teach you how to incorporate each of these elements into an excellent MMI answer.

    To learn more about our Mastering the Multiple Mini Interview course, including FAQs and access to the course, visit the Mastering the Multiple Mini Interview course page here.

    Improve your MMI skills in 1 week or less!

    Master the Multiple Mini Interview

    Learn to Confidently Tackle:

    Multiple Mini INterview Full Length Practice

    Once students take our Mastering the Multiple Mini Interview Course, our Cracking Med School Admissions team gets asked for even more Multiple Mini Interview example questions. We’ve created Multiple Mini Interview practice tests and made the questions publicly available so all premed applicants can benefit! 

    Instructions for MMI Practice Interviews:

    The best way to utilize these MMI practice interviews is to time yourself. We even built in a timer for you! Emulate your MMI interview day as closely as possible. To go above and beyond,  record yourself and listen to your responses. You can critique your soft skills, including communication. Analyze your interview performance and critique yourself about how you can improve. Remember, your interview score is an important component of the admission decision – so practice, practice, practice!

    1. For each question, open the question by pressing the dropdown arrow. 
    2. You will have two minutes to read the prompt and think about your response to the question. You can have a piece of paper to jot down notes.
    3. After the two minutes are done, you now have four minutes to give your response.* Please say your response out loud.

    *Note: On the real MMI Interview day, you will typically have 6-8 minutes to give a response. However, that time is allocated for follow-up questions and answers. 

    Practice Multiple Mini Interview #1 

    6 Minute Timer
    One current healthcare debate is whether schools should be able to enforce its students to wear masks. Should masks be mandated in schools?
    You have 2 minutes to prepare for this MMI question and 4 minutes to say your MMI answer out loud.
    Talk about a time when you worked in a team.
    You have 2 minutes to prepare for this MMI question and 4 minutes to say your MMI answer out loud.
    You are a Summer Camp Counselor and you notice that one of your campers seems down. You approach your camper, and he admits that he feels isolated and lonely, having trouble making friends. Your camper admits that he takes illicit substances, but he asks you not to tell any authority figure about this. How would you approach this situation?
    You have 2 minutes to prepare for this MMI question and 4 minutes to say your MMI answer out loud.
    You are volunteering in the Emergency Department and a patient comes in without a pulse. Immediately, the medical team performs CPR. The attending physician tells you to clean the area and put the patient’s belongings in a plastic bag. As you compile all the patient’s clothes, his wallet falls out of his pocket. You notice that his Driver’s License says DNR/DNI. Do you tell the medical team to stop doing CPR?
    You have 2 minutes to prepare for this MMI question and 4 minutes to say your MMI answer out loud.
    What will you contribute to our medical school class?
    You have 2 minutes to prepare for this MMI question and 4 minutes to say your MMI answer out loud.
    Discuss a time when you failed.
    You have 2 minutes to prepare for this MMI question and 4 minutes to say your MMI answer out loud.
    Your best friend calls you and tells you that his girlfriend broke up with him. He is extremely “depressed,” and states that he wants to end his life. How would you approach this situation?
    You have 2 minutes to prepare for this MMI question and 4 minutes to say your MMI answer out loud.
    On September 9, 2021, the FDA said it needed more time to decide whether e-cigarettes and vaping products can remain in the U.S. market. Do you think e-cigarettes should be made available to public? Should there be restrictions?
    You have 2 minutes to prepare for this MMI question and 4 minutes to say your MMI answer out loud.
    You are working on a class project with 4 team members. One of your team members is not showing up to meetings and has not contributed any content to the project. How would you approach this situation? You have 2 minutes to prepare for this MMI question and 4 minutes to say your MMI answer out loud.
    You are excited for your new role as the Teaching Assistant for Chemistry 1. During the first day of class, you meet your 10 new students who you will be teaching for the entire semester. However, as you review the first concept, you realize that students have different levels of basic chemistry knowledge. Some of your students do not know anything about chemical bonds while other students seem bored because they learned the content twice in high school. How would you address this teaching environment?
    You have 2 minutes to prepare for this MMI question and 4 minutes to say your MMI answer out loud.

    Practice Multiple Mini Interview #2

    6 Minute Timer
    You are a premed student working in a busy emergency room. You have shadowed multiple doctors and resident physicians before. One day, there is a multi-car accident and there are 5 trauma patients who come at the same time. After the emergency medicine teams stabilize all the patients, the attending physician asks if you could suture one of the patient’s arms. You’ve been taught how to do laceration repairs before, and you have sutured cuts on pig’s feet. How do you approach this situation?
    You have 2 minutes to prepare for this MMI question and 4 minutes to say your MMI answer out loud.
    Can you tell me about one influential or memorable patient encounter you had?
    You have 2 minutes to prepare for this MMI question and 4 minutes to say your MMI answer out loud.

    Talk about a research project you have been involved with.

    You have 2 minutes to prepare for this MMI question and 4 minutes to say your MMI answer out loud.

    Do you think the spread of health information through the internet has been more of a positive or more of a negative throughout the COVID-19 pandemic? Please discuss your thoughts.
    You have 2 minutes to prepare for this MMI question and 4 minutes to say your MMI answer out loud.
    Describe a conflict you had when you were a part of a team, and your role in the situation.
    You have 2 minutes to prepare for this MMI question and 4 minutes to say your MMI answer out loud.
    Especially because of the coronavirus pandemic, mental health issues – including anxiety and depression – are increasing at a rapid rate in the United States. How do you think we can tackle the mental health epidemic in the United States?
    You have 2 minutes to prepare for this MMI question and 4 minutes to say your MMI answer out loud.
    Talk about a time when you led a team.
    You have 2 minutes to prepare for this MMI question and 4 minutes to say your MMI answer out loud.
    You are a cancer physician who leads several clinical trials, including a stage IV breast cancer therapy. You see your patient, Mrs. Jordan, whose metastatic breast cancer is unfortunately continuing to spread. After looking at eligibility criteria, you confirm that Mrs. Jordan is eligible for this clinical trial. You know that Mrs. Jordan can potentially benefit significantly if she is in the “treatment” arm of this clinical trial. You ask the patient if she wants to enroll in the study, but she is extremely hesitant. How do you approach this situation?
    You have 2 minutes to prepare for this MMI question and 4 minutes to say your MMI answer out loud.
    You are a teacher in a public high school that requires all its students to wear masks at all times except during lunch. While you are teaching Algebra during Period 5, one of your students refuses to wear her mask. She claims that it’s her “personal freedom” to wear whatever she wants. How do you address this situation?
    You have 2 minutes to prepare for this MMI question and 4 minutes to say your MMI answer out loud.
    You are a physician in a primary care clinic and your patient is here to visit you for 3 days of diarrhea and vomiting. He says that his neighbor recommends he come to the clinic to ask for a prescription of antibiotics. What would you tell your patient and how would you approach this situation?
    You have 2 minutes to prepare for this MMI question and 4 minutes to say your MMI answer out loud.

    If you are prepared, the Cracking Med School Admissions interview gives you the perfect opportunity to standout and shine by sharing with people what you are passionate about.

    Med School Admissions Interview Guide eBook Cover

    50 Multiple Mini Interview Sample Questions

    Want even more MMI interview prep? Use these sample Multiple Mini Interview questions below.

    MMI Interview Questions – Current Event Scenarios:

    1. What systemic health and social inequities have caused healthcare disparities throughout the COVID-19 pandemic?
    2. Talk about one healthcare issue during the coronavirus pandemic that interests you.
    3. Misinformation has been an issue throughout the coronavirus pandemic. What are some strategies and solutions to curb health misinformation?
    4. Do you think the spread of health information through the internet has been more of a positive or more of a negative throughout the COVID-19 pandemic? Please discuss your thoughts.
    5. Should there be a COVID vaccine mandate? If so, who’s responsibility is it to create and enforce a vaccine mandate (The national government? State governments? Local governments? Private entities?)?
    6. One current healthcare debate is whether schools should be able to enforce its students to wear masks. Should masks be mandated in schools?
    7. Many patients with rare (orphan) diseases do not have FDA-approved treatment for their conditions. Fortunately, new drug discoveries are paving the way towards new treatments and diagnostics for rare diseases. However, once these drugs come to market, they are often extremely expensive, making them unaffordable or inaccessible to many patients. Do you think drug patents should last for fewer years so that cheaper, generic drugs can be made available?
    8. On September 9, 2021, the FDA said it needed more time to decide whether e-cigarettes and vaping products can remain in the U.S. market. Do you think e-cigarettes should be made available to public? Should there be restrictions?
    9. If you could implement one strategy to curb the opioid epidemic in our community, what would it be and why?
    10. Especially because of the coronavirus pandemic, mental health issues – including anxiety and depression – are increasing at a rapid rate in the United States. How do you think we can tackle the mental health epidemic in the United States?

    MMI Interview Questions – Team-based:

    Team-based mini – interview questions focus on your interpersonal skills. Through your answers, the interviewer can gauge your soft skills, including: teamwork, collaboration, conflict resolution, communication, listening, and empathy.

    Teamwork questions without a partner:

    1. Talk about a time when you worked in a team.
    2. Describe a conflict you had when you were a part of a team, and your role in the situation.
    3. Talk about a time when you led a team.
    4. Talk about a time when you led a team and you faced a challenge.
    5. You are working on a class project with 4 team members. One of your team members is not showing up to meetings and has not contributed any content to the project. How would you approach this situation? 

    Teamwork questions with a partner:

    These stations are designed to test your soft skills and interpersonal skills with another medical school applicant partner. It is important to stay calm. Even if your partner’s stress level escalates, you need to stay calm. 

    1. You are shown a drawing and your partner has a blank sheet / screen. Give instructions to your partner on how to draw the picture in front of you.
    2. You are given a picture with 3 shapes: a circle, a triangle, and a square. Each shape has a different design that fills the shape. Your interview partner is given an empty circle, triangle, and square. Give instructions to your partner to fill the shapes so it matches your picture.
    3. [In-person MMI only] You are given a figure of building blocks put together in the shape of a boat. Your partner has blocks (but are not stacked). Give instructions to your partner on how to build the boat figure using the blocks.
    4. You and your partner are judges for the XYZ School of Medicine Scholarship. Discuss how you would decide who will win this scholarship.
    5. You and your interview partner are on a life raft after a plane crash. There are currently 6 people on the life raft, including you and your interview partner. The raft will sink unless one person jumps off. How do you decide who will stay in the raft and survive?

    Mock Interviews: Refine your interview skills with us 1-on-1

    Dr. Rachel Rizal - Cracking Med School Admissions
    Rachel Rizal, M.D.

    Undergraduate
    Princeton

    Medical School
    Stanford

    Residency
    Harvard, Emergency Medicine

    Rishi Mediratta, MD, MSc, MA
    Rishi Mediratta, M.D., M.Sc., M.A.

    Undergraduate
    Johns Hopkins

    Medical School
    Stanford

    Residency
    Stanford, Pediatrics

    MMI Interview Questions – Ethical Situations:

    1. You are a Summer Camp Counselor and you notice that one of your campers seems down. You approach your camper, and he admits that he feels isolated and lonely, having trouble making friends. Your camper admits that he takes illicit substances, but he asks you not to tell any authority figure about this. How would you approach this situation?
    2. You are a Residential Adviser and you learn from one student that several other students on your dorm floor are taking Adderall. How would you approach this situation? Do you feel like you have an obligation to tell the Residential Dean or your superior about this issue?
    3. You are a cancer physician who leads several clinical trials, including a stage IV breast cancer therapy. You see your patient, Mrs. Jordan, whose metastatic breast cancer is unfortunately continuing to spread. After looking at eligibility criteria, you confirm that Mrs. Jordan is eligible for this clinical trial. You know that Mrs. Jordan can potentially benefit significantly if she is in the “treatment” arm of this clinical trial. You ask the patient if she wants to enroll in the study, but she is extremely hesitant. How do you approach this situation?
    4. You are a teacher in a public high school that requires all its students to wear masks at all times except during lunch. While you are teaching Algebra during Period 5, one of your students refuses to wear her mask. She claims that it’s her “personal freedom” to wear whatever she wants. How do you address this situation?
    5. You are volunteering in the emergency department and a patient comes in without a pulse. Immediately, the medical team performs CPR. The attending physician tells you to clean the area and put the patient’s belongings in a plastic bag. As you compile all the patient’s clothes, his wallet falls out of his pocket. You notice that his Driver’s License says DNR/DNI. Do you tell the medical team to stop doing CPR?
    6. There is an explosion in a nearby chemical plant. 40 injured individuals are going to come to your emergency department, and you are the attending physician in charge of the emergency department today. Please discuss how you would tackle this situation. How do you allocate your limited resources, including limited medical staff and limited hospital beds?
    7. You are second-year resident physician. Each month, you are supposed to report the number of hours you worked. Your Residency Director tells the group of residents explicitly to not count certain hours because the program will be cited for violating Resident Duty Hour rules. What do you do in this scenario? Do you report the accurate number of hours you’ve worked, which you know is over the Resident Duty Hour limit?
    8. You have a patient who is an immigrant from another country. He says that if he donates his kidney in his home country, he will receive $20,000. He comes to you in clinic today to discuss whether he should donate his kidney. He reveals that he really needs the money in order to pay for his mother’s hospital bills. What are your thoughts about this situation, taking into account the social and cultural context of this immigrant’s situation. 
    9. You are an oncologist and your patient, Mr. Dee, and his 3 children are here today to discuss the next steps of his treatment plan. After conducting a physical examination and looking at his test results, you learn that Mr. Dee has metastatic brain cancer, and he may have up to 3 months to live. He wants to go into palliative care and live the rest of his life pain free. However, his children are vehemently opposed to letting their father die. They want to do everything possible to let him live as long as possible. What do you do in this situation?
    10. A six-year-old pediatric patient has a large brain tumor that can possibly be cured if removed with surgery. However, his parents refuse any medical treatment, including pain medication and surgeries, because of their religious views. All they want to do is pray despite the physician telling them that there may be a bad future outcome. Discuss this ethical dilemma.

    MMI Interview Questions – Traditional:

    1. Discuss your journey towards a career as a physician.
    2. Why do you want to come to this medical school?
    3. What is one weakness and one strength of your medical school application?
    4. What is something you would like to tell the postgraduate admissions committee that we cannot tell from your submitted medical school application?
    5. Discuss a time when you displayed cultural sensitivity.
    6. Discuss a time when you failed.
    7. What is your leadership style?
    8. Can you tell me about one influential or memorable patient encounter you had?
    9. What are you looking for in an ideal medical school? What do you want out of your medical education? 
    10. Talk about a research project you have been involved with.

    MMI Interview Questions – Situational Questions:

    1. Your best friend calls you and tells you that his girlfriend broke up with him. He is extremely “depressed,” and states that he wants to end his life. How would you approach this situation?
    2. You are excited for your new role as the Teaching Assistant for Chemistry 1. During the first day of class, you meet your 10 new students who you will be teaching for the entire semester. However, as you review the first concept, you realize that students have different levels of basic chemistry knowledge. Some of your students do not know anything about chemical bonds while other students seem bored because they learned the content twice in high school. How would you address this teaching environment?
    3. You are a premed student working in a busy emergency room. You have shadowed multiple doctors and resident physicians before. One day, there is a multi-car accident and there are 5 trauma patients who come at the same time. After the emergency medicine team conducts a clinical examination and stabilizes all the patients, the attending physician asks if you could suture one of the patient’s arms. You’ve been taught how to do laceration repairs before, and you have sutured cuts on pig’s feet. How do you approach this situation?
    4. You are a physician in a primary care clinic and your patient is here to visit you for 3 days of diarrhea and vomiting. He says that his neighbor recommends he come to the clinic to ask for a prescription of antibiotics. What would you tell your patient and how would you approach this situation?
    5. You are a third-year medical student doing a clinical rotation in an extremely busy emergency department. You enter room #51. Immediately, your patient yells at you and is frustrated that he has been waiting 6 hours before getting a patient room. His stress level is a 10/10. How would you approach this situation?
    6. You are volunteering for your County’s Public Health Corp, and you lead the “Community Health Committee,” which includes you and 5 other members. You learn that your committee has received $100,000 to pilot any initiative that will improve the health of the community.  What initiative will you implement and why?
    7. You are co-presenting your research findings with a co-researcher in front of a live audience at a medical conference. 10 minutes before your presentation, your co-researcher panics. You learn that she has a fear of public speaking. How would you approach this situation?
    8. You are a Teaching Assistant for Physics 101. After the first midterm, one of your students who received an aggregate score resulting in a C- writes a poor review of you publicly on Facebook and “Ratemyteachers.com” stating that you are a bad teacher and did not teach concepts well. Furthermore, the student states that she felt unprepared for the midterm exam due to your poor teaching. What do you do in this scenario?
    9. You have been waiting in line for 3 hours to get an autograph from your favorite music artist. You know that the first 100 people are guaranteed an autograph and the next 100 people in line might get an autograph if time permits. Suddenly, 3 people join their friend in line right in front of you. What do you do? You are worried that you may not get an autograph.
    10. A 55-year-old patient comes to your clinic to discuss his lab results and findings. After looking at his chart, you see that he has uncontrolled hypertension and diabetes. He has also told you in previous clinic visits that he is a smoker but not an alcoholic. How would you approach this patient?

    School Specific MMI Interview Tips

    It’s important to apply the 4 S Framework taught in our Mastering the Multiple Mini Interview course when preparing for your Multiple Mini – Interviews.  However, medical schools have different cultures and missions, which is sometimes reflected in the types of scenarios at the MMI interview stations. We give additional tips to prepare for your Multiple Mini Interview for specific schools.  

    Schools with MMI Interviews
    Albany
    Duke
    Kaiser
    New York Medical College
    New York University, Grossman
    Oregon Health & Science University
    Stanford
    Tufts - Maine Medical Center (Tufts Maine Track)
    University of Alabama
    University of California, Davis
    University of California, Riverside
    University of California, San Diego
    University of Massachusetts
    Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell
    Albany Medical College MMI Tips
    • Prepare for questions that ask how you would approach patient encounters. Don’t forget to ask a patient’s medical history, conduct a physical examination, order relevant tests, and discuss a treatment plan. 
    Duke MMI Tips
    • Know current events and be able to articulate opinions about how to improve problems in healthcare.
    • Understand how to apply medical ethics to ethical Duke MMI questions.
    • Read about North Carolina health issues and current events. 
    • Have ideas about how to improve healthcare specifically in North Carolina during your Duke Medical School MMI answers.
    • Prepare for teamwork stations where you are giving instructions or solving a problem with a partner (another application).  
    Kaiser MMI Tips

    The Kaiser Permanente School of Medicine has both a traditional medical school interview and MMI interview during your interview day.

    • Convey ideas you have to change healthcare broadly. Leverage Kaiser’s hospital network and population health data.
    • Incorporate your leadership experiences and discuss the impact of your activities, similar to how you would in a one-on-one personal interview.
    New York Medical College MMI Tips
    • Common question types include how you would approach patient encounters, including discussing the cultural context of the patient encounter and how you would approach the physical examination.
    • Know local health and social issues around NYMC, and incorporate your insights into your NYMC answers.
    • Have ideas about how you want to improve the surrounding NYMC community.
    New York University (NYU Grossman) MMI Tips
    • Practice your responses to common traditional one-on-one interview questions.
    • Be able to talk about your research projects, academic accomplishments, and other outstanding extracurricular activities into your NYU MMI answers. 
    New York University Long Island (NYULI) MMI Tips
    • NYULI is focused primarily on primary care. So, some of the NYULI MMI interview questions surround primary care scenarios. 
    • Be able to incorporate your primary care clinical experiences.
    • Know common complaints and symptoms addressed by primary care physicians.
    • Understand pediatrics and medical ethics around parental consent.
    • Know about the Long Island community, including culture, demographics, and healthcare issues.
    • Have opinions about how to improve health professions training and primary care in Long Island. 
    Oregon Health & Science University MMI Tips
    • Read about how social issues affect health outcomes. Be knowledgeable about healthcare disparities in America and in Oregon.
    • Prepare for questions that ask how you would approach patient encounters.
    • Understand how to apply medical ethics to ethical dilemmas.
    • In the past, OHSU has had a station with a writing sample. Practice writing out your answers and saying your responses to MMI questions out loud.
    Stanford MMI Tips

    The Stanford University School of Medicine has both a traditional medical school interview and MMI interview during your interview day.

    • Incorporate your leadership experiences and discuss the impact of your activities, similar to how you would in a one-on-one personal interview.
    • Talk about innovative ideas in your healthcare fields of interests.
    • Study medical ethics and incorporate medical ethics principles in your responses.
    • Convey what you want to gain from your medical education at Stanford. Remember, Stanford is an inter-disciplinary school and you may want to pursue opportunities and classes at other graduate schools.
    Tufts Maine Track MMI Tips

    The Tufts Maine track has both traditional medical school interviews and an MMI during your interview day. 

    • Tufts Maine Track is focused on rural health. Be ready for questions about rural health issues and healthcare issues in Maine.
    • If you grew up or worked in the Northeast – specifically Maine – don’t forget to incorporate your life experiences and personal anecdotes into your interview responses. 
    • Have knowledge about alternative medicine techniques. Alternative medicine is not limited to only homeopathic medications. Many alternative medicine techniques include nutrition, physical therapy, acupuncture, and chiropractor. How would you integrate alternative medicine into your patient treatment plans?
    • Understand “western medicines” vs “homeopathic medicines.” Think about a scenario in which a patient comes in asking for your opinion about taking homeopathic medicines. What would you do?
    • Be knowledgeable about medical ethics.
    University of Alabama MMI Tips
    • Prepare for questions that ask how you would approach patient encounters. Don’t forget to ask a patient’s medical history, conduct a physical examination, order relevant tests, and discuss a treatment plan. 
    • Know health issues in Alabama and more generally, Southern United States. Importantly, you should know health issues between urban vs. rural health issues as well as white vs. African-American health outcome. 
    UC Davis MMI Tips
    • Study medical ethics and incorporate medical ethics principles in your responses. Common topics touched upon medical ethics types of questions include: patient confidentiality, informed decision making, and end-of-life decisions.
    • Have a solid understanding of healthcare issues in Northern California.
    • Relay ideas about how you want to improve Northern California health.
    • Have an answer prepared for why you want to attend UC Davis School of Medicine.
    • Prepare for questions that ask how you would approach patient encounters, including how you would respond in a stressful situation. 
    UC Riverside MMI Tips
    • Have a solid understanding of healthcare issues in the Inland Empire, including social and healthcare issues of immigrant communities in the Inland Empire. 
    • Incorporate your commitment and knowledge to the Inland Empire California community. If you volunteered or worked in the Inland Empire, it’s important to include stories from those experiences into your UCR MMI responses. 
    • Have an answer prepared for why you want to attend UC Riverside School of Medicine.
    • Prepare for questions that ask how you would approach patient encounters.
    UC San Diego MMI Tips
    • Practice traditional interview format questions.
    • Give examples of your research.
    • Understand social determinants of health and give ideas about how to reduce healthcare disparities.
    • Know healthcare issues in Southern California and social issues among immigrants, especially from Mexico.
    University of Massachusetts MMI Tips
    • Convey your interests and knowledge about Massachusetts social issues and healthcare.
    • Know healthcare issues in Massachusetts.
    • Incorporate your personal experiences and real life patient encounters, particularly with patients from Massachusetts / Northeastern United States.
    Zucker Hofstra MMI Tips
    • A common type of MMI station prompt asks how you would approach patient encounters.

    Get even more tips and common medical school interview questions.

    Med School Admissions Interview Guide eBook Cover
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